Google SEO & Search Engine Marketing Services

Mass Article Submissions Are Not Worth It…?

Over the last 3-4 weeks I have really been examining my backlinks, which ones pass the most juice, which ones have a preferential anchor text, which ones are relevant to the content of my page, and this little bit of research may have uncovered something I had feared for a while.

One thing I have noticed over the last 4 weeks is that I have been losing links sometimes as many as 500 in one week, this was quite disturbing and naturally I wanted to find out why.

On further investigation it became pretty clear, a lot of the links I had from article marketing were disappearing.

Let me run you through the scenario;

When I first started SEOwizz I used article marketing to get some quick links with the right anchor text, I fully recommend article marketing especially in the early days of a campaign, however what I have found out has changed my thinking.

I would submit articles through articlemarketer.com, this submits articles to thousands of directories. Out of the thousands of directories Google would index around 40 – 50 of the pages, great 40 – 50 valid backlinks per submission.

6 months later I have found myself in a tricky situation, 85% of the links are dropping out of the index apart from certain articles from strong domains, hence this is affecting my anchor distribution, link popularity and PageRank.

The Situation

The problem with article marketing has always been duplicate content. An article that can be found on thousands of different pages is only going to be indexed by a handful, therefore only a handful of the links are going to count.

Should You Article Market For Traffic

Is it still worth doing it for the traffic? Well anyone who has tried out article marketing will know the traffic form it is minimal, to say the least. Article marketing is all about getting anchored backlinks, however this could now be changing, in my opinion.

What Should I Do?

Here is my new advice on article marketing and I will be updating the tutorials asap.

Stop mass distribution, the pages the links are held on will not get indexed and the article directories that do stick are the ones with the strong domains. You don’t need to pay to distribute these articles, you simply need to submit them manually and their easy to spot, in my opinion you should only bother submitting to directories with a PR5 and above, this way the article has more chance of being indexed.

The sites I have found so far, that seem to hold long term link weight are;

– ezinearticles.com
– www.goarticles.com
– www.articlebase.com
– www.articlemonkeys.com

These are the 4 I would recommend submitting to as the page the article is on will most likely be indexed. Obviously if you find anymore directories PR5 or above go ahead and submit.

This in my opinion is a good starting strategy and an excellent way of building deep links.

I now, no longer recommend paying for distribution or mass article submissions software as most of the articles published will never be indexed.

Another reason not to use the submission service has a lot to do with link acquisition rate, I have noticed recenlty that Google are particularly sensitive to links gained in a short space of time. Best to avoid getting on the wrong side of Google simply because you have published an article to 1000 directories.

My opinion in the past is that submissions have been worth it but hey SEO is always changing and you constantly have to adapt.

Nice short one today but I hope, if you are using article marketing, to think quality directories over mass distribution.

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Author: Tim (255 Articles)

is the owner and editor of SEO wizz and has been involved in the search engine marketing industry for over 9 years. He has worked with multiple businesses across many verticals, creating and implementing search marketing strategies for companies in the UK, US and across Europe. Tim is also the Director of Search at Branded3, a Digital Marketing & SEO Agency based in the UK.

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